Lexikon

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Paisley

Paisley patterns are abstract, decorative patterns. The basic form of this pattern is a flourishing drop-shaped design, or a design similar to a leaf, with a pointed, curved tip. Paisley patterns are used for shirts, but also accessories such as scarves, ties and pocket squares.

 

Pepita

Pepita is the name of two-colour patterns in a twill weave. Different colours are woven together to form blocks squares with diagonal connections. Pepita is often used interchangeably with houndstooth.

 

Peter Pan collar

Peter Pan collars are a typical collar shape for blouses. The Peter Pan collar, named after its appearance in an early Peter Pan film, is a flat collar. Round-shaped collar wings are a typical feature. In addition, the Peter Pan collar is often white as a contrast for colourful blouses. This form of collar is too playful to be suitable for business fashion.

 

Pin stripes

Pin stripes is a classic pattern. Warp threads of different colours ware worked into a basic fabric where they appear as needle-fine longitudinal stripes. Predominantly light-coloured warp threads are used in a dark basic fabric, usually of a dark grey or dark blue colour. Pin stripe suits are particularly elegant. Nowadays, the pattern can also be found, for example, on shirts or neckties.

 

Pinpoint

Pinpoint is the name of a type of Oxford fabric which is a mixture of plain and basket weave made using fine yarns. The refined fabric structure looks plain coloured due to the small dot pattern. Pinpoint fabric is sturdy and durable, with a firm feel.

 

Piqué

Piqué is a type of fabric and is also the name for both woven and knitted fabric constructions. The fabric is named after the construction. Knitted piqué is used for polo shirts. The surface has a textured, dimpled structure which is air-permeable and elastic.

 

Plain-weave houndstooth check is a small check pattern. Often, no clear distinction is made between plain-weave houndstooth and similar patterns, such as pepita and Vichy houndstooth check. In technical terms, plain-weave houndstooth check refers to a mostly two-tone pattern slightly resembling the shape of a windmill. The pattern is distinguished by rectangular extensions, as opposed to pepita and Vichy houndstooth check, where the extensions are diagonal.

 

Plastron

Plastron is one of the many predecessors of today's necktie and was first developed around 1860 from several overlaying tie knots. This scarf-like tie was - and still is - worn with a cutaway or frock coat. Nowadays the Plastron is almost exclusively used in equestrian sports. It is also worn by bridegrooms as part of traditional, elegant dress.

 

Polo shirt

A polo shirt is a slip-on shirt with a short row of buttons. Polo shirts are available in many different variations, colours and materials. They can be worn for all sporting events, but can also substitute for a shirt, if the dress code is not too formal.

 

Popelin

Poplin is the name of shirt fabrics with a plain weave. This weave is the simplest and oldest of the three basic weaves. Each yarn is firmly interlaced, making poplin hard-wearing, durable and at the same time smooth and supple.

 

Pratt knot

This tie knot was named after the member of the US Chamber of Commerce, Jerry Pratt. It is also referred to as the Shelby knot, because TV presenter Donald Shelby often wore a similarly knotted tie in his shows.